Did You Know that Marriage Based Green Cards are Always Available to Immigrants?

heart flag ring enhanced

One of the most popular means for becoming a lawful permanent resident of the United States is through obtaining a marriage based green card.  If you are married to a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, you can apply through him or her for your own lawful permanent resident status.    A spouse who is a U.S. citizen is considered an “immediate relative” by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), conferring you with the highest immigration priority.  This means that if you apply for your green card through your U.S. citizen spouse, you will not have to wait for a green card slot to become available.  Spousal green cards are available all the time.  Your Immigration Angel helps immigrants navigate the U.S. immigration system.  Our special focus is helping people stay in the U.S. immediately.  If you have any questions on becoming a U.S. citizen through a marriage based green card, call or email us for a free initial consultation.

A Nation of Immigrants

jfk speech big

“Immigration policy should be generous; it should be fair; it should be flexible. With such a policy we can turn to the world, and to our own past, with clean hands and a clear conscience.”

–John F. Kennedy, A Nation of Immigrants

President Obama Promises to Take Executive Action in the Wake of Congressional Failure to Implement Immigration Reform  

barack-obama-immigration-427jc070110

The United States has historically been a melting pot of immigrants, each immigrant community bringing an additional ingredient to the rich mélange that is the U.S. population.  As such, immigrants have been instrumental in helping build this country and are an intrinsic part of American history.  However, Immigrant communities have been waiting for months for immigration reforms to meet the growing needs of the people.  Unfortunately, Congress has been unable to agree on any actions to meet current immigration needs.  Every U.S. President since 1965 has made executive decisions on immigration issues, and President Obama is no exception.  The President has broad executive authority to shape the enforcement and implementation of immigration laws.  The President can exercise prosecutorial discretion to defer deportations and streamline adjudications.  Already, President Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, has deferred deportation for young adults brought to the U.S. as children.  Further reform focusing on circumventing family separation is one of the main areas expected to be addressed soon by the Obama administration.